Cycling

Patient Conditions

Pain and discomfort of the feet can affect our mood and overall ability to enjoy each day. At Rieter Podiatry Associates, we want you to feel your best every day! Many foot and ankle conditions can be easily prevented or treated when patients are equipped with the necessary information. Browse through our conditions library to learn more about topics that interest you. When you're ready, call for an appointment. 

Arch and Ball of the Foot

These conditions generally develop as a result of improper footwear, injury, or overuse. Weight gain may also play a contributing role.

Children’s Feet

Children have flexible, resilient feet that are much less susceptible to the pains and discomforts associated with adulthood. None-the-less, childhood development poses a few concerns. It is very important to pay attention to a child's gait.

  • Cavus Foot
  • Clubfoot
  • Flat feet
  • In-toeing
  • Out-toeing
  • Sever’s Disease
  • Tarsal Coalition

Common Foot and Ankle Injuries

Throughout an individual's lifetime, they are exposed to a plethora of pain inducing foot and ankle injuries. The following conditions are caused by injury, repeated trauma, or accident.

Deformities

Foot and ankle distortions are associated with inheriting certain foot structures. Deformities develop on their own but can become excessively aggravated through wearing improper footwear.

Diabetes and Circulatory Disease

Individuals with diabetes are prone to developing foot and ankle conditions. Due to the reduction of blood flow to the feet and loss of sensation there is an increased risk of danger as many symptoms  go unnoticed until after they've become severe.

Diseases of the Foot

Feet are known to display the first signs and symptoms of disease in the body. The distance from the foot to the heart and exposure to stresses make it prone to developing disease.

  • Arthritis (Osteoarthritis, Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Cancer
  • Charcot Foot
  • Gout
  • Raynaud’s Disease
  • Sever’s Disease

Heel Pain

Pain located in the heel can cause great discomfort. These conditions are not associated with life-threatening circumstances, but heel pain when the feet are at rest is indicative of a problem more severe than what meets the eye.

Nail and Skin Problems

Invasive foreign bodies, such as bacteria and fungi, may infect the skin and toenails. These conditions are associated with two extremes: overly dry environments or exceedingly moist environments.  Improper footwear can also be a contributing factor.

Nerve/Vascular Disorders

Symptoms of nerve and vascular disorders include burning or stabbing pain. These sensations occur at irregular intervals, even during times of rest and relaxation.

  • Diabetic Neuropathy
  • Morton’s Neuroma
  • Peripheral Nerve Compression
  • Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Toe Problem

The toes provide the entire body with the ability to move and a sense of balance while standing, walking, or running. Problems develop as a result of trauma to the foot, improper footwear, and overuse.

  • Bunions
  • Hallux Rigidus
  • Hammertoe
  • Intoeing
  • Overlapping/underlapping toes
  • Turf toe

Patient education is vital to patient health. Dr. Todd Rieter wants you to make the best decisions possible when it comes to your health and well-being. If you have a condition that has gotten out of hand, let us help! Call 262-338-0901 or book your appointment online. Help us, help you.

Since the bicycle's invention in the early 1900s, it has been a favorite form of recreation and sport in the U.S. More than 100 million Americans enjoy biking, either for recreation or, increasingly, for commuting to work each day. While a great workout for most of the body, feet play a vital role in cycling. They are responsible for the transfer of energy from the body to the pedals, which makes the bicycle move.

Keeping the alignment between the hips, knees, and feet is the most efficient way to operate a bicycle. Lack of proper body alignment and overactivity are responsible for the most common foot problems related to biking: Achilles tendonitis, sesamoiditis, shin splints, and foot numbness or pain.

Cycling Shoes

For the casual or recreational cyclist, a typical athletic shoe used for running, walking, or cross-training is perfectly fine for biking. Just be sure that the sole is firm and not worn down so that it grips the pedal to avoid slipping.

For more serious cyclists, next to bicycles themselves. proper shoes are the most important piece of cycling equipment. In general, cycling shoes should have a stiff sole and fit snugly around the bridge of the foot and heel. The more stable and less movement inside the shoe, the more power can be transferred through the entire foot to the pedal. Also look for shoes with ventilated uppers to keep feet more comfortable. Closure systems vary, including lacing, buckles, straps, and Velcro -- or some combination. You can choose whichever feel most comfortable to you. However, be careful that any loose ends (from straps or laces) and buckles don't hang over, as they can pose a safety hazard if you elect to use toe clips.

The type of biking you do can impact your choice of shoes as well. For road cycling and racing, shoes that have stiff soles, a narrow heel, and snug fit are best. For mountain biking, the shoes also need a decent tread for better grip and a more rugged sole.

Many serious cyclists use some form of a toe clip system. These allow the rider to transfer power from the body to the pedal in both the up and down motions of the leg. Simple toe clips have metal or plastic clips that attach to any type of shoe with strapping. However, they are not as efficient at energy transfer because they allow the foot to bend. Additionally, hanging straps can pose a danger. Clipless systems use metal or plastic cleats in the sole of a shoe that attach to bindings on the pedal. These are a good choice for road or race cycling, but they do take some adjusting to initially. Also, the cleats make the shoes unwearable for walking. Clips are generally not advised for mountain biking since the foot comes off the pedal frequently.

Remember to take the socks you plan to wear with you when trying on cycling shoes to make sure the fit is right.


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*open 2nd and 4th Saturday of the month