Clubfoot

Patient Conditions

Pain and discomfort of the feet can affect our mood and overall ability to enjoy each day. At Rieter Podiatry Associates, we want you to feel your best every day! Many foot and ankle conditions can be easily prevented or treated when patients are equipped with the necessary information. Browse through our conditions library to learn more about topics that interest you. When you're ready, call for an appointment. 

Arch and Ball of the Foot

These conditions generally develop as a result of improper footwear, injury, or overuse. Weight gain may also play a contributing role.

Children’s Feet

Children have flexible, resilient feet that are much less susceptible to the pains and discomforts associated with adulthood. None-the-less, childhood development poses a few concerns. It is very important to pay attention to a child's gait.

  • Cavus Foot
  • Clubfoot
  • Flat feet
  • In-toeing
  • Out-toeing
  • Sever’s Disease
  • Tarsal Coalition

Common Foot and Ankle Injuries

Throughout an individual's lifetime, they are exposed to a plethora of pain inducing foot and ankle injuries. The following conditions are caused by injury, repeated trauma, or accident.

Deformities

Foot and ankle distortions are associated with inheriting certain foot structures. Deformities develop on their own but can become excessively aggravated through wearing improper footwear.

Diabetes and Circulatory Disease

Individuals with diabetes are prone to developing foot and ankle conditions. Due to the reduction of blood flow to the feet and loss of sensation there is an increased risk of danger as many symptoms  go unnoticed until after they've become severe.

Diseases of the Foot

Feet are known to display the first signs and symptoms of disease in the body. The distance from the foot to the heart and exposure to stresses make it prone to developing disease.

  • Arthritis (Osteoarthritis, Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Cancer
  • Charcot Foot
  • Gout
  • Raynaud’s Disease
  • Sever’s Disease

Heel Pain

Pain located in the heel can cause great discomfort. These conditions are not associated with life-threatening circumstances, but heel pain when the feet are at rest is indicative of a problem more severe than what meets the eye.

Nail and Skin Problems

Invasive foreign bodies, such as bacteria and fungi, may infect the skin and toenails. These conditions are associated with two extremes: overly dry environments or exceedingly moist environments.  Improper footwear can also be a contributing factor.

Nerve/Vascular Disorders

Symptoms of nerve and vascular disorders include burning or stabbing pain. These sensations occur at irregular intervals, even during times of rest and relaxation.

  • Diabetic Neuropathy
  • Morton’s Neuroma
  • Peripheral Nerve Compression
  • Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Toe Problem

The toes provide the entire body with the ability to move and a sense of balance while standing, walking, or running. Problems develop as a result of trauma to the foot, improper footwear, and overuse.

  • Bunions
  • Hallux Rigidus
  • Hammertoe
  • Intoeing
  • Overlapping/underlapping toes
  • Turf toe

Patient education is vital to patient health. Dr. Todd Rieter wants you to make the best decisions possible when it comes to your health and well-being. If you have a condition that has gotten out of hand, let us help! Call 262-338-0901 or book your appointment online. Help us, help you.

Clubfoot is one of the most common, non-life threatening, major birth defects among infants globally. Approximately one in every 1,000 newborns has clubfoot. Of those, one in three have both feet clubbed. The exact cause is unknown. Two out of three clubfoot babies are boys. Clubfoot is twice as likely to occur if one or both parents and/or a sibling has had it. Less severe infant foot problems are often incorrectly called clubfoot.

Clubfoot twists the heel and toes inward. It often appears like the top of the foot is on the bottom. Additionally, the clubfoot, calf, and leg are smaller and shorter than normal. When clubfoot is detected at birth, it is not painful and is correctable.

The goal of treating clubfoot is to make the infant's clubfoot (or feet) functional, painless, and stable by the time he or she is ready to walk. Serial casting is the process used to slowly move the bones of a clubfoot into the proper alignment. The doctor starts by gently stretching the child's clubfoot toward the correct position. A cast is put on to hold the foot in place. One week later, the cast is removed, the baby's foot is stretched a little farther toward the correct position, and a new cast is applied. X-rays are used throughout the process to check on progress toward proper foot alignment. Casting generally repeats for 6-12 weeks, and may take up to 4 months.

About half the time, clubfoot straightens with casting. Once the proper foot alignment is achieved, the child is fitted with special shoes or braces to keep the foot straight once corrected. These maintenance devices are used until the child has been walking for up to a year or more. Muscles for children with clubfoot commonly try to return to the clubfoot position; a regular occurrence among 2 and 3 year olds, but a condition that may continue up to age 7.

In some cases, stretching, casting, and bracing is not enough to correct clubfoot. Surgery may be required to adjust the tendons, ligaments, and joints in the foot and ankle.


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